The English Learners' Blog

A blog for English learners and their teachers everywhere, initiated in 2010 with the contribution of students from the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland. More about me on the On-line Profile below. Welcome!

Join Pearson’s “6 STEPS to Exam Success” Online Training Program (February-April 2019)

6 Steps to Exam Success

This training program aims to support teachers and their students with a holistic approach to exam preparation. Cambridge exam experts, consultants, authors, trainers and experienced teachers will provide a holistic view on successful exam preparation, taking us through the basics and all the way to final exam success.  

Here are the speakers and the agenda. You can use this link to register. See you there!

Lindsay Warwick

Lindsay Warwick

Lindsay is a teacher, trainer and materials writer. She has been teaching general English and exam preparation courses for over twenty years.

She is a CELTA trainer and has delivered teacher development courses in the UK and abroad on topics such as train the trainer, using technology in the classroom and helping learners to prepare for exams.

She is co-author of Gold Preliminary B1, Gold Experience B1 and B2+, Expert IELTS 6 and Pearson’s new general English series Roadmap (A2 and A2+).

Step 1: Understand your exam

20th February, 2019

Any teacher helping students to prepare for an exam needs to understand the exam at hand.

In this webinar, we’ll look at key tasks in Cambridge exams, the theory behind them, common difficulties with those tasks and how learners can overcome them. We’ll also look at changes to the Cambridge Preliminary/Preliminary for Schools and Key/Key for Schools exams coming in 2020.

Step 2: Balance your teaching

27th February, 2019

For some learners on an exam course, their main goal is to develop their language skills so they can communicate better. For others, passing the exam is their main goal.

In this webinar, we’ll look at ways that we can deliver lessons so we both develop a learner’s language skills and prepare for the exam. We’ll look at techniques and activities that help us to find the right balance and meet every learner’s needs.

Philip Warwick

Philip Warwick

Phil has been involved in ELT since 1988, working in a variety of countries such as Italy, China, Brazil and Czechia and teaching all types of students from prep school students in a school just outside Hastings to designing materials and teaching scientific writing to Czech scientists for an EU-funded project in Brno.

He’s currently academic manager for a UK based summer school with centres in London, Brighton, Oxford, Cambridge and Canterbury and for an English project in Ilia State University in Tbilisi, Georgia.

In between these commitments Phil works as a teacher trainer for Pearson English, and is never happier than when he can step back inside a classroom, which he does in his friend’s language school in Brno as often as time allows.

Step 3: Monitor progress

6th March, 2019

Students need to have a clear idea of what their strengths and weaknesses are when it comes to passing exams and in order to do this, teachers need to have clear strategies for each skill tested.

This webinar will look at building exam strategies and identifying progress points. This will allow teachers to offer valid guidance and supervision whilst differentiating between the skills and parts of the exam so that they can review key concepts and track students’ progress.

Step 4: Give feedback

13th March, 2019

A good teacher plays many roles but when it comes to exam preparation probably one of the most important is that of language coach. If a teacher cannot deal with student performance and implement further practice through delivering valid feedback then students will suffer.

This webinar will look at the coaching cycle and how teachers can utilise it to evaluate student performance so that they can provide different forms of feedback and give prompts and tips for improvement.

Billie JagoBillie Jago

Billie has been working in the ELT industry for 7 years, teaching in more than 7 countries, including China, Spain and Italy.

Billie has taught all types of students, from 1:1, to large classes of up to 70. She has spent the last few years focusing on teaching exams and creating course content, and now works as a teacher and teacher trainer in Cambridge.

In between this, Billie is currently completing her DELTA qualification.

 

Step 5: Motivate your students

20th March, 2019

Whether a short course or long course, exam students can easily become demotivated.

This webinar offers strategies and tips on how to maintain student enthusiasm in a positive classroom environment.

We’ll be looking at techniques on how to avoid repetition and motivate students of mixed abilities and skill sets, by looking at how to add variety to common task types and providing the opportunity for these activities to become more student-centred.

John Wolf

John Wolf

John is a MA graduate in Applied Linguistics and DELTA graduate.

For the first part of his teaching career he worked in language schools, teaching mainly younger learners and teenagers, and eventually branched out into other areas of EFL instruction, including exam English, business English, and teacher training.

Currently he works as an international teacher trainer and university lecturer, which provides him with plenty of opportunities to create and search for new ideas for teachers and students.

Step 6: Enjoy your course

26th March, 2019

Teaching exam courses puts a lot of pressure on teachers. We strive to make the experience enjoyable and fruitful, not only for the learners but also for the teacher.

In this webinar I will be sharing some strategies for teaching exams with enjoyment. These include: managing exam practice, readying your repertoire, delegating task creation and finally – deflating the pressure.

Amy Malloy

Amy Malloy

Amy Malloy is a writer and editor, and the founder of No More Shoulds, teaching mindfulness for healthier, kinder minds.

With 15 years’ experience in teaching, assessment and educational publishing, she now combines this first-hand understanding with certified training in wellbeing practices to help educators and students find inner calm in a stressful world.

Mindfulness for pre-exam stress

3rd April, 2019

The reality of modern English teaching means exams hold higher stakes than ever: a new career, a higher education place, even a new country of residence.

This webinar looks at how mindfulness, the practice of paying conscious awareness to the present moment, allows us to calm the effect of such stress-inducing situations on our thoughts and feelings by actively shifting our relationship with stress. In turn, our students can find it easier to meet exams with a calm, clear head.

We will demystify mindfulness practice, take a straightforward look at the neuroscience behind stress in exam situations, and explore practical mindfulness exercises you can carry out with your students.   

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Filed under: ■ Conference Speakers, ■ How to Learn Languages, ■ Stress, ■ Talks & Conferences, ■ Teachers

[GenZ-er Lessons] Foods of Tomorrow

Nati is my teenage student, a GenZ-er born during the 21st-century technology revolution. Although the internet, cellular technology, social media, and You Tube are the staples of any GenZ-er’s world, Nati still believes in the power of books and would not trade a book for its brief 3-minute summary video. She loves tongue twisters in English, as well as languages other than her native Polish. Whenever she reads out a new English word with a difficult pronunciation, she is happy to take on the challenge and get it right. As soon as she does, she is proud to acknowledge that she mastered another “tongue twister.” Learning can be so much fun, love working with GenZ-ers! 

Paris Worldwide 24_2018_ParisAt our latest lesson, I introduced Nati to the Paris Worldwide Magazine, the March/April 2018 edition that I picked up at an airport in Paris. Both in French and in English, the magazine has lots of interesting articles with plenty of “tongue twister” challenges for a GenZ teenager and, no surprise, is available online. You can try it with any learner generation, as the audience can be all ages.

Here’s what I chose to focus on with Nati: the article What Will We Eat Tomorrow on page 78.

Before diving into reading and tackling the new words, our “tongue twister” challenge, I asked Nati to brainstorm and write down any thoughts around the foods of tomorrow for two minutes and a half. Then we moved on to reading the first pages of the article (78 to 83). As we went through the article reading out and explaining the context and meaning of different words, we referred back to her brainstormed ideas and marked any thoughts in common. There were many!AIRGATE 2_2018_Krakow

Using airport magazines to curate lesson materials is a great idea. Any big city airport has one. Krakow makes no exception either. Here’s the latest one, the 2nd issue of 2018 of AIRGATE. 

Check out the Dubai questionnaire on page 12.

Choosing a current issue of an airport magazine makes interacting with a text in English very profitable for any learner generation.

What fun English learning resources have you discovered lately?

Filed under: 4►LIFE, 5►LEARN MORE FROM:, ■ Books, ■ Generations

What Could You Do with a One-Minute Story?

Emily Casriel, Head of Editorial Partnerships and special projects for BBC World Service Group, gives a detailed account of her project Take 10 animation in a blog post published a month ago.  

This project involves MA student animators from the Animation Department at the University of the West of England (UWE), who were given a great challenge: to animate 10 one-minute audio clips, inspired by 10 inspirational stories  from BBC World Service.

Here is how  

Student animators get creative with one minute World Service stories

Testimony of former child soldier Deng Adut, animated by Laura-Beth Cowley and Carwyn David.

Take the harrowing tale of being hauled in front of Islamic student activists in Iran, the search for an elusive bird in East Africa or the first-person experience of a child soldier. Hack each complex and rich story to precisely one minute. Now present those 60-second tales to a bunch of student animators and ask them to draw upon their wildest creative imagination to craft films that are so full of personality that they will engage people across the world. 

When I visited the Animation Department at the University of the West of England UWE to meet its MA students, I was presenting them with a demanding challenge. As I played the one-minute audio clips, drawn from a range of BBC World Service output, the animators listened intently with furrowed brows and occasional smiles.  

The students were already visualising how they could bring to life an attractive story while plotting how they could wriggle out of being assigned the toughest stories. Who would be tasked with imagining the story of a corrosive Soviet town and who would have fun bringing to life the wine-loving bear?

I first developed the partnership with the University of West of England (UWE) two years ago, when it was already clear that animating audio was an effective way to engage audiences which might not already be consuming BBC News content. Bethan Jinkinson from BBC World Service Digital was excited to collaborate on this project because of its potential to showcase and share the richness of our audio offer.

Research with the BBC’s Global Minds panel indicated that audiences liked snacking on content. The combination of factual content with a creative treatment seems to be attractive, perhaps because it engages both sides of our brain. Sharing something intelligent, yet still accessible, makes people look informed in front of their peers, which in turn drives viral success.

The search for a rare East African bird inspired animator Thomas Porras.

The BBC is increasingly experimenting with animated audio – from Omar’s Journey which depicts the journey of a teenage refugee in the Jungle in Calais based upon his own drawings, to The Today Programme animating the news. When I used to run the ideas discussion show The Forum I even experimented by personally animating its 60 second idea.  

I sought out UWE in Bristol as it is renowned for its creative flair and enjoys links to some of the most successful animation companies in the world, such as the local Aardman studios, home of Wallace and Gromit. Back in 2014, we collaborated with Chris Webster, the course leader, and his second year BA students to produce an animation based on a BBC World Service Outlook interview about Antarctica, saunas and naked running. Truly.

There were many exchanges over the tiniest of details from the texture of the sky (richer and more artistic) to permissible nudity (bottoms acceptable, full frontal not). I learned that the students needed to be encouraged to fly free of a too literal interpretation of the spoken word, while still keeping to the spirit of the message. This knowledge was useful when I briefed the graduate students this year for our more fully fledged partnership.   

My follow-up visit to the MA students was exciting if a little daunting for all of us. The students, who had been attracted to the course from across the world – from Vietnam to Venezuela – were now on the cusp of exposing their creative imagination to an external client for the very first time, awaiting judgement on the first ‘draft’ of their one-minute masterpieces.

From the moment the first film was shown on the screen, I could see that the MA students were in a different league to their BA counterparts. Yet I was a little confused by seeing a set of wooden films with little movement. The students patiently explained to me that the animatic wasn’t the finished film, merely a moving sketch book.

They had all put tremendous energy into researching the world behind their one minute clips.   Michail Gkialas Fikaris had watched numerous YouTube videos of his beatboxing subject (above) to understand not only the artist but also the beatboxing culture.

Linh Nguyen had drawn upon a Japanese vintage aesthetic to animate the story of a robot (above) which was born the moment its mother unwrapped the packaging. Not content with the audio narrative that I had presented to her, she had inserted an angry unicorn with a murderous laser beam as a visual sub plot. This burst of creativity led to a discussion about the importance of a visual narrative that would complement rather than compete with the audio. Linh’s finished animation sticks a little more faithfully to the audio clip, though it is still full of visual jokes reflecting her subversive originality.

I was also impressed with how Nagore Rementeria Muriel used stark black and white graphic images and negative space to create a tense atmosphere in her depiction of fear in revolutionary Iran (above). She built a 3D model of an Iranian man to rotate for the animation, and scribbled intimidating anonymous figures.  

Hannah Stevens had enlisted the help of her six year old cousin to imagine the two headed purple mutants of a fabled Soviet town, and then drew on World War Two propaganda films to create a cinematic atmosphere (above).  

And it was fantastic to see some stop motion animation in the mix with Sasha Lawrence’s story of the first legal inter-racial marriage in South Africa. Sasha took plywood and plaster to create a three tiered wedding cake (above) and found a 1980s Jet Magazine picture of the couple online to inspire her creation of the bride and groom puppets. 

At the end of our session together, tutor Chris Webster told his students that one of the most valuable lessons of this partnership was to understand the mindset of a client and the likelihood that they wouldn’t understand the animating process. He is committed to helping his students not only develop their own voice – all of the animations are highly individual – but also equip them with skills that will enable them to succeed in the world of deadlines and client demands. 

I am excited to share these jewels with our worldwide audience by publishing them on the BBC website, broadcasting them on BBC World News and seeing reactions as we share these films on a whole range of social media platforms. I hope that people around the world will appreciate the thought and inventiveness that has gone into these richly layered treats and feel tempted to find out more.       

The animations are available on the BBC News website, BBC World News and across social media. 

 

Filed under: 3►STYLE, 5►LEARN MORE FROM:, ■ ANIMATE, ■ Animations, ■ Communicate, ■ Creativity, ■ How to Tell a Story, ■ Movies, ■ The Path of Metaphor, ■ Thinking Space, ►META PHORS▼

Translators Recommend: 7 Tips to Learn a New Language

TED-Ed-language-image

Knowing more than one language is great for your brain. But what’s the best way to learn? TED’s Open Translation Project volunteers share 7 tips:

  1. Get real. Decide on a simple, attainable goal to start with so that you don’t feel overwhelmed. German translator Judith Matz suggests: “Pick up 50 words of a language and start using them on people — and then slowly start picking up grammar.”
  2. Make language-learning a lifestyle changeElisabeth Buffard has been teaching English for 27 years. She says that consistency is what separates the most successful students from the rest. Find a language habit that you can follow even when you’re tired, sick or madly in love.
  3. Play house with the language. The more you invite a foreign language into your daily life, the more your brain will consider it something worth remembering. “Use every opportunity to get exposed to the new language,” says Russian translator Olga Dmitrochenkova. For example, you might label objects in your house in the language, read kids’ books written in it, or watch subtitled TED-Ed Originals.
  4. Let technology help you out. Dmitrochenkova has a great idea: “A funny thing like resetting the language on your phone can help you learn new words right away,” she says. Ditto for changing the language on your browser. Or you can seek out more structured learning opportunities online. Dutch translator Els De Keyser recommends Duolinguo for its approach to grammar, and Anki for memorizing vocabulary with its “intelligent” flashcards.
  5. Think about language-learning as a gateway to new experiences. To Spanish translator Sebastián Betti, learning a language has always been about focusing on the experiences that the new language would open up, from “visiting theme parks, to enjoying cowboy poetry and folk-rock festivals, to learning about photo-essay techniques.” In other words, he thinks of fun things that he wanted to do anyway, and makes them into a language-learning opportunity. Many of our translators shared this advice. For example, Italian and French translator Anna Minoli learned English by watching undubbed versions of her favorite movies, while Croatian translator Ivan Stamenković suddenly realized he could speak English in fifth grade, after years of watching the Cartoon Network without subtitles. So the next time you need a vegan carrot cake recipe, find one in the language you’re trying to learn.
  6. Make new friends. Interacting in the new language is key — it will teach you to intuitively express your thoughts, instead of mentally translating each sentence before you say it. Find native speakers near you. Or search for foreign penpals or set up a language tandem online, where two volunteers help one another practice their respective languages.
  7. Do not worry about making mistakes. One of the most common barriers to conversing in a new language is the fear of making mistakes. But native speakers are like doting parents: any attempt from you to communicate in their language is objective proof that you are a gifted genius. They’ll appreciate your effort and even help you. Nervous about holding a conversation with a peer? Try testing your language skills with someone a little younger. “I was stoked when I was chatting with an Italian toddler and realized we had the same level of Italian,” recalls German translator Judith Matz. And be patient. The more you speak, the closer you’ll get to the elusive ideal of “native-like fluency.” And to talking to people your own age.

This article was adapted for TED-Ed from a TED Blog post by Krystian Aparta published on January 19, 2016 in Interviews

Filed under: 5►LEARN MORE FROM:, ■ TED, ■ Translators

Teachers Recommend: Enrich Your English Vocabulary

Welcome back from holiday!

The first post in 2016 comes from the teachers at the school Solo Idiomas in Madrid.

Here’s what teachers there recommend:

Solo Idiomas

1. In order to enhance your speaking skills, the first thing you have to do is create a comfortable environment for “language immersion”. If you have never been to an English speaking country, try to combine different activities:  read blogs, articles, listen to music you like (don’t forget to pay attention to lyrics, as you can learn some new colloquial expressions from them), watch series and TV shows in English. These are effective ways to learn expressions that you may not find in textbooks. While practicing any of the activities above, try to guess the meaning of words from their context before looking them up in the dictionary.

2. If you try to memorize words out of context, one by one, it will be a bit challenging to use them naturally in the flow of speech. It is very important to learn how to use collocations, as English words have a lot of meanings depending on their usage with verbs and prepositions.

 Once you have added new words to your vocabulary, try to use them as often as possible, make up questions and sentences for extra practice. You may also find it helpful to make notes of synonyms as well as antonyms when you record new words, to expand your vocabulary. This will help you distinguish between general and more specific meanings of words.

3. Use monolingual dictionaries (English-English dictionaries). You will expand your vocabulary in a very effective way if you use monolingual dictionaries instead of a bilingual ones. Surely it will take a bit more time to find the right definitions, but you will learn a lot of synonyms and your speech will gain in accuracy.  Plus, it is a great way to “dive” into language. The more you investigate new language, the more confident you will become. Some of the most popular online dictionaries are Merriam-Webster, Oxford and Longman.

4. Create a memo book to write down the new words. It may sound boring for you to write down words to learn, but organizing your personal word lists is an activity which definitely will help you expand the number of words in your active vocabulary. I would suggest that you stick to a certain routine – it is much more efficient to practice English 30 minutes every day than 2 hours at the weekend. Choose which way is suitable for you: either write the words in alphabetical order, or combine them thematically. You can also use your tablet or phone to organize your vocabulary.

5. Remember that all these techniques are particularly useful if you practice English with a friend or tutor. That’s why we recommend that you join a conversation English class or a regular English meeting in your city. 

*****

So, if you find yourselves in Madrid, you are welcome to pay a visit to Solo Idiomas.

If you may find yourselves in Krakow this January, it is worth checking out this invite from the American Consulate:

U.S. Consulate Krakow Language Club  
The Consulate is pleased to continue the second edition of the English Language Club for Polish high school and university students. Each week the club will focus on a new discussion topic drawn from important issues of the day. The goal of the club is to give English language learners an opportunity to develop their speaking skills in an informal setting. All levels of English are welcome. Participants must register in advance to participate in an English Language Club session. Complete information is available on the Consulate website.

 

 

 

Filed under: 5►LEARN MORE FROM:, ■ How to Learn Languages, ■ School, ■ Teachers

SNOWFLAKES – SCIENCE & ART

Artist Rogan Brown's paper sculptures are many times larger than the organisms that inspire them. Magic Circle Variation 5 is approximately 39 inches wide by 39 inches tall in its entirety. Brown has created multiple versions of Magic Circle, the shape of which alludes to a petri dish and a microscope lens.

Artist Rogan Brown’s paper sculptures are many times larger than the organisms that inspire them. Magic Circle Variation 5 is approximately 39 inches wide by 39 inches tall in its entirety. Brown has created multiple versions of Magic Circle, the shape of which alludes to a petri dish and a microscope lens. Courtesy of Rogan Brown

Do you remember cutting paper snowflakes in school? Artist Rogan Brown has elevated that simple seasonal art form and taken it to science class.

These large-scale paper sculptures may evoke snow, but actually trade on the forms of bacteria and other organisms. The patterns may feel familiar, but also a bit alien. You’re not looking at a replica of a microbe, but an interpretation of one. And that distinction, Brown says, is important.

“Both art and science seek to represent truth but in different ways,” the 49-year-old artist, who lives in France, tells Shots. “It’s the difference between understanding a landscape by looking at a detailed relief map and understanding it by looking at a painting by Cezanne or Van Gogh.”

Brown wants to you to feel something looking at these sculptures.

Last year, he met with a group of microbiologists to plan an exhibition on the human microbiome. He became fascinated by the hidden world of microbes and the strange shapes of pathogens. He was particularly interested in humans’ fear of the invisible microbiological world. That meeting led him to spend four months creating Outbreak entirely by hand.

Outbreak, which is approximately 58 inches long by 31 inches tall, was exhibited in London in 2014.

Outbreak, which is approximately 58 inches long by 31 inches tall, was exhibited in London in 2014. Courtesy of Rogan Brown

Outbreak took four months to cut and build. Brown writes on his website that the slow process of cutting mimics the "long time-based processes that dominate nature: growth and decay."

Outbreak took four months to cut and build. Brown writes on his website that the slow process of cutting mimics the “long time-based processes that dominate nature: growth and decay.” Courtesy of Rogan Brown

A detailed view of Outbreak shows the delicate forms Brown cut by hand. He says he works with paper because it "embodies the paradoxical qualities that we see in nature: its fragility and durability, its strength and delicacy."

A detailed view of Outbreak shows the delicate forms Brown cut by hand. He says he works with paper because it “embodies the paradoxical qualities that we see in nature: its fragility and durability, its strength and delicacy.” Courtesy of Rogan Brown

He starts each construction by sketching detailed designs and then mocking them up in larger pen and ink drawings. Then he begins to think in 3-D. Each structure is composed of layers of paper, which are stacked using foam board spacers. This floating effect allows him to build a complex colony of organisms that appear to grow beyond the confines of their housing.

In Cut Microbe, that growth is chaotic. The whip-like appendages of the creature branch outward in an invasive way. Those legs, Brown writes on his website, were inspired by the flagella of Salmonella and E. coli, tiny appendages that help the bacteria move.

Cut Microbe, left, was cut entirely by hand. The entire sculpture, right, measures approximately 44 inches tall by 35 inches wide. Brown says it was inspired by Salmonella and E. coli.

Cut Microbe, left, was cut entirely by hand. The entire sculpture, right, measures approximately 44 inches tall by 35 inches wide. Brown says it was inspired by Salmonella and E. coli. Courtesy of Rogan Brown

In Magic Circle, the architecture is more constructive, ordered — there are colonies of intricately shaped forms that evoke the collaborative, constructive network of a coral reef. It also evokes microbes and diatoms.

Magic Circle borrows from the forms of bacteria, microbes, diatoms and coral. Brown needed a laser to cut some of the more intricately designed shapes.

Magic Circle borrows from the forms of bacteria, microbes, diatoms and coral. Brown needed a laser to cut some of the more intricately designed shapes. Courtesy of Rogan Brown

Some of Brown’s work is sliced meticulously by hand using a scalpel. Others, like the one above, are also cut using a laser. The end result is a fragile paper sculpture that borrows from what we can see as well as the artistic imagination.

“We live in a world dominated by science,” Brown says. “Art needs to work hard to keep up or use the language and imagery of science for its own ends.”

Source: Meredith Rizzo, Is This Snowy Wonderland Or The World Inside A Petri Dish?, NPR, December 25th 2015

Filed under: 5►LEARN MORE FROM:, ■ Arts/ Music/ Dance, ■ Biology, ■ Nature, ■ TED

To Learn More, This High-Schooler Left The Classroom

To listen to the interview below, follow this NPR link.

Boy surrounded by the wonder of learning.
 Like a lot of students, 17-year-old Nick Bain says he really likes his school, but sometimes it can feel like a chore.

“It just feels a little bit like you just have to keep doing one thing after another, but without a whole lot of thinking about an education in general,” says Nick.

So one day he decided to write down what he was doing every 15 minutes at the Colorado Academy in Denver.

And in his seven-hour school day, Nick says there were only “2 1/2 to three hours that you actually really do need to be in class,” to get instructions from the teacher. The rest of the time was spent at lunch, getting books from his locker or reading.

“It occurred to me that maybe the way school is now is not the perfect way,” he says.

Motivation As A Powerful Force

Nick saw a TED Talk by education researcher Sugata Mitra about his famous experiment in India. It showed how children living in Indian slums could teach themselves to use a computer.

“It’s just incredible that that sort of intrinsic motivation exists,” Nick says. “It seems like a really, really powerful force.”

That led him to come up with his own unusual experiment in learning. He would spend the final trimester of his junior year learning on his own.

With enough convincing, he got his school and parents to sign off on the plan.

He’d take the same tests and write the same essays as other students, but wouldn’t attend class. He’d be graded on a pass/fail basis. It would be a self-taught and self-paced journey.

Nick would take seven courses, instead of the normal four, including calculus, Advanced Placement physics and advanced French.

He also designed some of his own courses: In one, he worked with local scientists on a climate change project; in another, he built a one-seat model aircraft.

He journaled along the way.

Nick’s Journal — March 24, 2015

“I’m again feeling that I’m not efficient enough, but maybe efficiency isn’t the most important thing. I definitely feel like I’m learning. But there isn’t that sense of constant urgency that causes one to save time in all sorts of ways when one is under the gun. But what that also means is that I can walk through the park, for example, to the gardens without feeling constant anxiousness about things.”

Thinking In French

Nick experimented with different ways to learn. First he tried to learn a bit of a subject every day. That didn’t go so well. Then he asked, “What if I spent 10 hours a day on one subject?”

Eventually, he found that being steeped in one subject all day led to more learning.

He figured that out one day at the Denver Botanic Gardens while reading Jules Verne’s Around the World in 80 Days — in French.

“I’d been reading it, and reading, and I wasn’t really liking it because I wasn’t understanding some things,” he recalls. And then by the end of the day, “I realized I was reading the French as fast as the English.”

He discovered his learning wasn’t more efficient on his own because he was spending every waking hour learning. His mother, Lisa Bain, said this last trimester was the hardest she’s ever seen Nick work.

“It was hard to get him to relax,” she says. “It’s important to have downtime, and school sometimes allows you to have the downtime. But when you are self-directed, there’s no time that’s not something you could be doing.”

Nick’s Journal — March 6, 2015

“Noticed that I’m actually under a lot of pressure. Thought flexibility would make things less of a strain, but actually causes more of a strain. Constantly thinking: Is what I’m doing right now the best possible use of my time, and that seems to make me highly inefficient, actually. So it’s a lot harder than I thought, and less efficient than I thought. Realizing that I don’t ever feel finished with something, that there is always something I can be doing.”

Learning More Deeply

At the same time, Nick said his learning was more satisfying outside of school. It had more purpose and he was learning more deeply.

As the days passed, he started to relax into the joy of learning. He realized he wasn’t feeling that anxiousness he felt in school with a conveyor belt of assignments coming at him.

And because Nick was on a pass/fail system, he didn’t worry about the best way to get a good grade. Instead, he realized he was working hard at something because he wanted to.

Nick’s Journal — March 18, 2015

“I’ve been hesitating to note this (because of the possibility that it might not hold true), but I feel exactly as Nate Newman said he felt at Stanford: ‘This is the happiest I’ve ever been in my life.’ It’s always risky to say things like that because they may turn out differently with time. But I have never been so enthralled by learning, ever. I wish only that I could do it for years and years.”

The Value Of School

Nick is heading back to class for his senior year this fall, but that’s not because the experiment was a failure. In fact, he kept up with his classmates, passing his exams and classes. But one of the unexpected results of the experiment, he says, is that now he can see his school — and teachers — in a different light. He appreciates the role teachers play as curators of the best material.

“[There are] some huge benefits to learning with people that I really missed and I’m going to be glad to go back to,” he says.

“The greatest thing is really this,” he says of his experience: “I can be 45 years old, or 27, any age, or doing anything and become an expert on anything.”

“It makes me really excited for the rest of my life, I guess, because I know that it doesn’t have to stop when I stop school.”

Nick’s Journal — June 2, 2015

“Today was the last day of school. It did not feel like the last day of school. It was very strange. I rode my bicycle home, ate some fruit (it was a half-day), and wrote a 3 page essay on Kant and Voltaire. I think I would have laughed at myself pretty hard at doing something like this last year at this time.

“I think today is probably an appropriate time to end this log. Maybe I’ll sporadically note developments and general time usage over the next few weeks — at least some data would probably be helpful, I think. Otherwise, I don’t think I should even try to describe in a few broad statements the effect of these past months. Neatly summing it up here would not capture the magnitude of its value.”

Filed under: ■ NPR, ■ School

ONE Word>>>ONE LANGUAGE<<<ONE Song

One effective method of learning new languages is simply listening to music sung in that language.

There is something appealing to our senses in doing that – books, magazines, movies and other sources aside. While speaking with a colleague the other day about learning new words in German by listening to music, I was struck by this internal question: what songs would I choose if I were asked to make a list of songs in English to help a foreigner learn new words and phrases. 

For starters, I would choose songs that asked life’s biggest and most common questions, questions that deal with life-long obsessions, myths and even daily reality. One of the most pervasive topics in songwriting through the generation has been oneness:

Here are three of my personal heroes in this regard, three songs that capture a universal expression of the one.

ONE WORD (Joe Cocker), which tells a beautiful story of the meanings of peace in our life – meanings both commonly understood, and also oftentimes misunderstood;

ONE LOVE (Bob Marley), which speaks of the one-ness we experience in being together and comforting each other in times of need;  and 

ONE (U2), a song about discoveries we may be led to make through the inner journey of our lifetime. For starters. 

 Take a listen while reading, if you please. The lyrics to each song are under each player.

“One Word (Peace)”

A man stands on the corner holding a sign
People yell at him as they drive by
I wonder what they read, made them so upset
I looked at the sign and all it said:

One word: Peace
In the neighborhood, peace
One word: peace
In my own backyard, peace

A man in a foreign land kneels to pray
And wonders where the bombs will fall today
Our leaders tell me to fear him you see
Love conquers all is what I believe

One word: Peace
In the neighborhood, peace
One word: peace
In my own backyard, peace

Everybody’s talking about it
Everybody’s got to have their say
But to achieve it, there is only one way
And it starts with me and the word and the word is:

Peace
In the neighborhood
One word: peace
In my own backyard
Peace
One word

One word: peace
In the neighborhood, peace
One word: peace
In my own backyard, peace

***

“One Love, One Heart”

Let’s get together and feel all right
Hear the children crying (One love)
Hear the children crying (One heart)
Sayin’ give thanks and praise to the Lord and I will feel all right
Sayin’ let’s get together and feel all right

Let them all pass all their dirty remarks (One love)
There is one question I’d really love to ask (One heart)
Is there a place for the hopeless sinner
Who has hurt all mankind just to save his own?
Believe me

One love, one heart
Let’s get together and feel all right
As it was in the beginning (One love)
So shall it be in the end (One heart)
Give thanks and praise to the Lord and I will feel all right
One more thing

Let’s get together to fight this Holy Armageddon (One love)
So when the Man comes there will be no no doom (One song)
Have pity on those whose chances grove thinner
There ain’t no hiding place from the Father of Creation

Sayin’ one love, one heart
Let’s get together and feel all right
I’m pleading to mankind (one love)
Oh Lord (one heart)

Give thanks and praise to the Lord and I will feel all right
Let’s get together and feel all right

***

“One”

Is it getting better
Or do you feel the same
Will it make it easier on you now
You got someone to blame
You say…

One love
One life
When it’s one need
In the night
One love
We get to share it
Leaves you baby if you
Don’t care for it

Did I disappoint you
Or leave a bad taste in your mouth
You act like you never had love
And you want me to go without
Well it’s…

Too late
Tonight
To drag the past out into the light
We’re one, but we’re not the same
We get to
Carry each other
Carry each other
One…

Have you come here for forgiveness
Have you come to raise the dead
Have you come here to play Jesus
To the lepers in your head

Did I ask too much
More than a lot
You gave me nothing
Now it’s all I got
We’re one
But we’re not the same
Well we
Hurt each other
Then we do it again
You say
Love is a temple
Love a higher law
Love is a temple
Love the higher law
You ask me to enter
But then you make me crawl
And I can’t be holding on
To what you got
When all you got is hurt

One love
One blood
One life
You got to do what you should
One life
With each other
Sisters
Brothers
One life
But we’re not the same
We get to
Carry each other
Carry each other

One… life

One

***

Filed under: 5►LEARN MORE FROM:, 6►THEME CHEST, 9►EXTRA, ■ Arts/ Music/ Dance, ■ Empathy, ■ Lyrics, ■ YouTube

Aristotle and the Philosophy of Everyday Life

Many of the sayings we use daily were first coined by Aristotle (384-BC – 322 BC).
His studies in living the Good Life (nothing to do with Felicity Kendall looking seductive in dungarees and wellies) included advice like; moderation in all things, friends are worth more than gold and one swallow doesn’t make a summer. Fair enough, but how can we stop just quoting him and start living Aristotle’s Good Life? Much of his thinking seems surprisingly contemporary. He covers mindfulness, the value of teachers (his habit of wandering around the grounds of the school he founded, the Lyceum, in Athens, with his pupils trotting after him, led his pupils to be referred to as ‘the peripatetics”, or “people who travel about”) and the difficulties of adolescence.
So here’s BBC Radio 4’s guide to Aristotle’s ‘Good Life’

1. Value your friends

“For without friends no one would choose to live, though he had all other goods.”

2. Keep learning

Aristotle considered happiness to come more often from “those who are highly cultivated in their minds and in their character, and have only a moderate share of external goods, than among those who possess external goods to a useless extent but are deficient in higher qualities.” So that’s something to bear in mind when you go over your overdraft limit.

3. Reward yourself for overcoming personal struggles

“I count him braver who overcomes his desires than him who conquers his enemies; for the hardest victory is over self.”

4. Value teachers

The mean-spirited phrase ‘those that can, do. Those that can’t, teach” is a corruption of Aristotle’s ‘those that know, do. Those that understand, teach.” Aristotle saw happiness, fulfilment and a sense of civic duty all arising from education, and felt that “those who educate children well are more to be honoured than parents, for these only gave life, those the art of living well.”

5. Do it, don’t just talk about it

Actions speak louder than words. “Virtue is more clearly shown in the performance of fine actions than in the non-performance of base ones.”

6. Practise mindful meditation

A thought is just a thought. It doesn’t need to be acted upon. “It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.”

7. And finally…

Aristotle’s ultimate, and most difficult realisation. “Happiness depends upon ourselves.”

Filed under: 1►TO DO, 5►LEARN MORE FROM:, ■ Books, ■ The Path of Metaphor, ■ Thinking Space

TED’s 30th anniversary + TOP 10 moments for women in TED

The article below was published on Glamour, March 5th 2014. Here it goes:

Today, TED announced that Charmian Gooch, an anti-corruption activist who cofounded the watchdog organization Global Witness, is this year’s winner of the $1 million TED Prize. (Gooch will explain on March 18 how, specifically, she will use the money to make her “wish” for the world a reality.) You can watch her incredible TED talk—and read through her detailed annotations—on ted.com. But that’s just one of many TED talks given by women that have inspired us. To celebrate Gooch’s win, and TED’s 30th anniversary (yes, TED turns 30 this year!), we asked Anna Verghese, deputy director of the TED Prize, to curate the top 10 moments for women in TED that we all need to see.

TED-Prize-Charmian-Gooch-Anna-Verghese
2014 TED Prize Winner Charmian Gooch (left), and TED Prize Deputy Director Anna Verghese (right)

“There are now more than 1,700 TED talks—”ideas worth spreading”—available online, many of them by badass women,” Verghese told Glamour. “I’m honored to make recommendations of just 10 of the many talks, from scientists to artists, writers to leaders, that have made me feel smarter and more prepared to take on the world in just 18 minutes or less.” Watch a few to get through the afternoon slump at work, or take ’em all in later. We guarantee you’ll be inspired!

Sheryl Sandberg: Why We Have Too Few Women Leaders 


“This is the talk that preceded [Lean In],” says Verghese. “[It’s] a great, unconventional, persuasive take on the way that women take themselves out of the running for leadership positions.”

Chimamanda Adichie: The Danger of a Single Story


“The young Nigerian author gives a beautiful, elegant, and at times hilarious talk about the danger of believing a single, narrow story about anything or anyone,” says Verghese. “My favorite anecdote: When she arrived at college in the U.S., her roommate asked to hear some of her ‘tribal music.’ Chimamanda pulled out a Mariah Carey CD.”

Amy Cuddy: Your Body Language Shapes Who You Are


“An essential talk for all young women! Cuddy is a psychologist and Harvard Business School professor who explains how our posture and body language shape not only how others see us but how we see ourselves,” says Verghese.

Leymah Gbowee: Unlock the Intelligence, Passion, Greatness of Girls

“The Nobel Prize winner from Liberia shares powerful stories about the unlocked potential of girls worldwide, who are still far from [being] treated as equal citizens,” says Verghese.

Brené Brown: The Power of Vulnerability

“This blockbuster talk came out of one of our TEDx events in Houston,” says Verghese. “Brené’s take on vulnerability—and why it’s essential to our relationships and to our success—has won her millions of fans worldwide.”

Elizabeth Gilbert: Your Elusive Creative Genius


“The author of Eat, Pray, Love offers unconventional advice on how to nurture your own creativity,” says Verghese. “Her advice: Take some pressure off yourself, but never stop creating.”

Courtney Martin: Reinventing Feminism


“A beautifully heartfelt talk, she describes the three paradoxes that define her generation’s question to define the term [feminism] for themselves,” says Verghese.

Angela Patton: A Father-Daughter Dance…in Prison


“The is the amazing and moving story of a group of preteen girls who organized a father-daughter dance in the prison where their fathers were incarcerated,” says Verghese. “I wept.”

Jill Bolte Taylor: My Stroke of Insight 


“Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor is a neuroscientist who observed her own stroke as it was happening. This is one of the most popular TED talks of all time,” says Verghese.

Cynthia Breazeal: The Rise of Personal Robots

This MIT professor “talks about her love of robots—which began when she saw Star Wars as a girl (R2D2!)—and new kind of intelligent, personal robots she designs,” says Verghese.

Did any of your favorite TED talks by women not make this list? Do you love one of the talks Verghese selected? Share your top picks in the comments below!
Photos: James Duncan Davidson (Gooch); Mike Femia (Verghese); videos courtesy of TED

Filed under: ■ Conference Speakers, ■ GLOBAL, ■ Talks & Conferences, ■ TED, ■ Women

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